Decluttering inspiration- books to get you started on your minimalist journey

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

When we decide to declutter our home, we want to get it done. We often start off strong. We feel an urge to get rid of all the things. We fill up bags full of stuff and our house feels different. Lighter. Once the obvious items have been decluttered, it can start to feel difficult. It can become overwhelming. It can be easy to have motivation but we can lose momentum.

Why not learn from the brightest and the best in the business? Most of these authors started off just like you and me. They were surrounded by excess stuff and wanted a change. They needed to do something different. They learnt by doing and figured out strategies to help others do the same.

Many were parents who felt suffocated by all the things in their home. It was making them feel crazy. Something had to change. Something had to go, and it couldn’t be the kids. As toys tend to be a big part of the problem, they become a large part of the process.

It’s one thing to ditch some plastic junk that you are sick of stepping on and putting away. It’s another to involve your children. Getting your children on board with decluttering is an important step. When we come alongside them to sort out what they don’t love or use, and find new homes for them by donating or selling, we help them to form new habits.

Below are my favourite books on decluttering that might be useful to you too.

1. The Minimalist Home by Joshua Becker

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

The Minimalist Home is the inspiration you need to start decluttering. Joshua does a deep dive into each room of the house and gives you steps to follow and questions to ponder. This helps you to reduce the inventory so you can focus on what really matters. Joshua has a comprehensive blog, YouTube channel and has published a number of other titles.

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2. Messy Minimalism by Rachelle Crawford

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

Messy Minimalism is for the messy folk out there who aren’t typically good at organising their homes. She takes a judgement free approach to decluttering and is permission giving that your house doesn’t need to look perfect. Rachelle has strategies and solutions that you can implement to create a purposeful home. She runs the Abundant Life with Less online community.

3. Declutter like a Mother by Allie Casazza

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

Declutter like a mother is written for mothers who are overwhelmed with all the stuff and are desperately seeking a change. Allie understands that season and openly talks about how seriously she struggled with this in early motherhood. In her book she motivates women to take charge, to get rid of the excess and to make a change for the better. Allie has a popular podcast, runs decluttering challenges, a book for children and has a huge following online.

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4. Minimalist Moms by Diane Boden

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

Minimalist Moms is for mothers who seek to live intentionally. Diane gives a convincing argument for why reducing the stuff can have a positive impact on our lives. She gives practical steps to help you declutter your home. She also talks about the benefits of slowing down and saying no to extracurricular activities, and how this can help family life. Diane started with a podcast and has a community of like-minded individuals who strive to do more with less.

5. A Simpler Motherhood by Emily Eusanio

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

A simpler motherhood empowers mothers to live life on purpose. When we declutter our homes and make a conscious effort to slow our schedule, it can have enormous benefits for our family. Emily unlocks the secrets to a simpler and more intentional life, and delves into marriage, parenting and faith. You can find Emily at The Simplified Mom on Instagram.

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6. Love People, Use Things by Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

Love People, Use Things speaks about the power of reducing what we have in our homes and simplifying our schedule. When we take steps to do this, it can change the trajectory of our lives. Known as The Minimalists, they took decluttering to a radical level and couldn’t help but share their journey. You can find Joshua and Ryan on their website, listen to their podcast or watch their documentaries Minimalism and Less is Now on Netflix.

7. Project 333 by Courtney Carver

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

Project 333 encourages readers, especially women, to consider how many outfits are in their wardrobe and how many of these actually get worn. Getting ready in the morning can be stressful and partly because we have too many options. Courtney writes about how you can manage with just 33 items in your closet for 3 months, and learn to love it. You can find out more on her website and Instagram.

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8. The Life Changing Magic of Tidying up by Marie Kondo

10 Books to read when you want to declutter

The life changing magic of tidying up takes readers through an expert guide on decluttering. Marie explains the order that she uses to tackle each area of the home. She has a particular way of folding and storing items so that they are visually appealing and are stored neatly. Marie is a multi million copy international bestseller, writes more about her KonMari method on her website and has a series on Netflix.

In closing, these titles are packed full of ideas to get you inspired to start decluttering and practical steps you can follow. I love that these books not help you to get rid of the physical clutter, but help you to become more intentional with the time that we have. Life is short and the time we have with our children is precious.

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Books can make great gifts. I know I have so many that I’d love to receive. Why not add a few that catch your eye and save them to your wishlist. You’ll be supporting a hard working author and you can always give them to a friend when you are finished.

These are available to purchase on Amazon or your favourite bookshop. Many are also available to borrow from your local library and can help to save you money. If you enjoy listening to audiobooks, apps like Libby and Borrowbox enable you to borrow titles for free.

I’m so excited for you as you begin your decluttering journey or seek to minimise your home even more. I know that as you reduce the clutter, you’ll gain more space, increase your focus and give you back more time. I’d love to hear about your journey and connect with you on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

Why Reading Eggs is worth signing up for

Why Reading Eggs is worth signing up for

Looking for an educational app for your child that will help them learn to read? Look no further. Reading Eggs is a scientifically based program, designed by Australian teachers. They have expertly crafted this resource with your child in mind. As an educator and mum, I feel that Reading Eggs is worth signing up for. Here are the reasons why:

1. Develops early literacy

Why Reading Eggs is worth signing up for

Reading Eggs helps to develop early literacy in under fives. It can be a great way to help prepare your child for school. As my eldest was five and a half when he started Foundation, he needed to be stimulated more than I was able to at home. I tried my best but things were full on with my baby and toddler.

He was an early reader so it was so helpful to have Reading Eggs help him consolidate his learning and extend him. Children can keep their same account when they transition to school so don’t lose the level they are on or points they’ve accumulated.

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2. Suitable for all ages

Reading Eggs has literacy and numeracy programs for children ages 2-13. It caters for the youngest learners with Reading Eggs Junior (ages 2-4), then Reading Eggs (3-7), Reading Eggspress (7-13) and Mathseeds (3-9). Their site contains a wealth of resources.

My 5 year old loves Fast Phonics and Reading Eggs, and sometimes tries Reading Eggspress for a challenge. My 3 year old loves Reading Eggs, sometimes opting for Reading Eggs Junior because he likes the games. I love watching them progress to different levels and you can really see how much they are learning. Reading Eggs is compatible both on tablet and desktop devices.

3. Engaging activities

Reading Eggs has a huge range of activities, games, stories and quizzes. It is such a fun program and kids love it. Children work at their own pace and are given lots of encouragement along the way. Children earn coins which can buy things for their virtual shop and golden eggs to play games.

It motivates children to work hard to get to the next level. Reading Eggs has hundreds of online reading lessons and thousands of books to read online. Children can create and change their own avatar to make it more personable.

4. Teaches children how to read

This wonderful site helps to teach children how to read. Nothing will take the place of good old fashioned reading aloud with a physical book, but this in conjunction with reading to your child will go a long way to helping them learn how to read.

The Reading Eggs program is focused around the five essential keys for reading success – phonics, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency. It is developed by experienced teachers and based on scientific research so it’s no accident that it works!

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5. Great for educators

Reading Eggs is a wonderful tool for educators. In my experience it is often used in the classroom during activities first thing in the morning, reading groups (as one of the rotations), computer room or iPad whole class time and afternoon activities.

It is brilliant for time poor teachers who know that this is a tried and tested program, targeted to suit every individual child. Teachers can see how their students are progressing and can access useful reports. Students have a login code to use at home and can continue to play the games and activities whenever they are allowed.

6. Useful for parents

I love that with Reading Eggs, you know how your child is going. Progress reports are emailed and you can also look the reports up anytime. It is helpful to know what level your child is at and what they are working towards. Reading Eggs provided parents with handy hints of targeted activities for their child. These help to build on and extend the learning they have completed. I can’t help but feel proud when my boys pass a level, and love to celebrate with them by printing out the certificates to display.

7. Makes screen time educational

Why Reading Eggs is worth signing up for

My ideal self would not use screen time at all. I love the idea of children being outside and keeping active for most of the day. However, between acute morning sickness, recovering post birth, navigating a newborn with a toddler and preschooler in tow, toddlers stopping naps at the age of 2, and everything in between, I’ve come to realise that screen time helps me cope. I use Reading Eggs as a motivator to get my eldest ready in the morning. This helps him to focus on what he needs to do first before he can go on the iPad and play. I know that he is learning valuable skills and not just watching cartoons.

8. Free 30 day trial

Why Reading Eggs is worth signing up for

I love that Reading Eggs offer a 30 day free trial. This is a good amount of time to see if you see the value, see if it engages your child, see if it helps them learn and see if it fits in well with your family. There is no obligation to subscribe afterwards – simply cancel before the trial ends.

The customer service team are lovely to deal with and happy to answer any questions. It might be that you love the app but don’t want your child to be on a device just yet. Fair enough! Keep it in mind for down the track when they are a bit more ready. It has to fit with your family and what works for you. Click here for the link if you’d like to find out more.

In terms of pricing, if you decide to sign up it costs $13.99 / month or $109.99 / year ($9.17 / month) at the time of writing. It’s pretty great value (or should I say eggcellent) when considering the four programs it covers.

However, with the high cost of living right now, every extra subscription does need to be considered carefully. It can always be a gift idea that a family member or grandparent could put money towards if you are trying to steer away from lots of physical items.

Last thoughts

In closing, Reading Eggs is a program worth signing up to. Educators and parents alike see the many benefits and children love using it. It’s such a well designed program and one that both engages and educates children of all ages. It helps make screen time count. With the thirty free trial, you really have nothing to lose. I encourage you to give it a try and let me know what you think.

* Please note that this is not a sponsored post. I am writing it purely because I see the value in my own children’s learning and students at school.